Upcoming workshop with Emily Schroeder Willis

Hands On With Emily Schroeder Willis | $175.00 

Day 1:  Nov. 16th, 10:00AM – 5:00PM  | 1 hour break for lunch (student responsibility)
Day 2: November 17th, 12:00PM – 3:00PM
Emily SchroederPresenter at the 2013 Utilitarian Clay conference at Arrowmont and Chicago Studio Artist
Many people shy away from learning how to make pinch pots, often
equating it with elementary processes that lack elegance and delicacy. 
In this two-day workshop, we will challenge this thinking. By using only
her hands and a few basic tools, Emily will show several different ways
to create elegant pinched and coiled forms such as pitchers, cups, open
vessels and vases.  We will discuss tapering forms and how to create
volume by simply manipulating the clay during the building process. 
Additionally, she will demonstrate how she creates and uses bisque and
greenware molds to help support and shape complex bases. The workshop
will be divided up into 3-hour demo in the morning and three hours of
hands on time in the afternoon. This workshop is for all skill levels;
no previous ceramic experience is required.      

http://www.pewabic.org/adult-classes

www.emilyschroeder.com 
www.objectiveclay.com

Upcoming Lee Arts Workshops

REGISTER:  By Phone:  703-228-0560 or 703-228-0558

Fall 2012 Registration Form
INFORMATION:  703-228-0560, or email Steven Muñoz, Director, Lee Arts Center  

‘IN A PINCH’
WITH EMILY SCHROEDER WILLIS

Saturday & Sunday, September 29-30, 2012
10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Emily Schroeder Willis
Ever think that pinch pots can’t be light or delicate? This workshop will challenge common stereotypes of working with the simple pinch pot. Emily will demonstrate her process of creating vessels through pinching and coiling with porcelain. She will show techniques such as building work upside down, creating basic molds with simple coils and using bisque molds to help aid in flat forms. Additionally, she will discuss how to add volume without adding mass. Through the process of coiling and pinching, she will explore how to build a variety of forms ranging from large jars and platters to small cream and sugar sets. Emily will also share her methods of creating lids and feet as well as a variety of ways to make rims and handles. On the last day she will focus on finishing touches and review some of her glazing techniques.
This workshop will have a balance of demonstrations, discussions and hands-on studio time. Mornings will be spent with Emily showing her techniques and in the afternoon participants will try their hand at creating objects utilizing her methods. Throughout the workshop Emily will show slides of historic and current practices of pinch pots. Please bring a sketchbook to discuss and present ideas. Some clay experience is suggested.
Emily Schroeder Willis received her MFA from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 2006. She is the recipient of numerous awards and scholarships, including the 2001 Jerome Fellowship from the Northern Clay Center and the Sage Scholarship from the Archie Bray Foundation. Her work has been exhibited across North America as well as in Europe, Central America and Australia. She has been an artist-in-residence/visiting artist at the Archie Bray Foundation in Montana, the Zentrum Fur Keramik in Berlin, Germany and the Alberta College of Art and Design in Canada.
Emily will also be a presenter for the 2012 Utilitarian Clay Conference at Arrowmont School for the Arts and Crafts in Tennessee this September as well as an artist in residence at Anderson Ranch in the fall of 2012. She currently resides in Chicago as a full time studio artist. For more information on her work please visit her website.

HANDLE IT!
WITH RYAN J. GREENHECK

Saturday & Sunday, October 20-21, 2012
10:00am – 4:00pm
Fee:  $190.00 non-LAC/ $180 LAC members
Ryan Greenheck
Have any of these thoughts ever crossed your mind as you’ve worked on a handle for your piece? That any handle you make would make would ruin it. You only know of one way to approach making a handle. You feel your handles are the weakest part of your pieces. Or asked these questions: Where should I place the handle? What type of handle does this piece need? Is there a better way to make this handle? If so…then this is the workshop for you!
This hands-on workshop will focus on wheel thrown forms that incorporate a handle. Ryan will demonstrate various wheel throwing and trimming techniques emphasizing the mug form, while lidded jars, pitchers, and teapots will also be presented. Placement of the handle in each piece will be a consideration from the start. Ryan will also share several ways to make handles such as slab, and coiled techniques; with a concentration on several ‘pulled’ handle skills. Every aspect of the handled vessel will be discussed and meticulously investigated.
Ryan J. Greenheck received his Master of Fine Arts degree from SUNY College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 2004. He also received, a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree as well as a Bachelor of Science degree from The University of Wisconsin-Stout in 2002. In the summer of 2004, he spent three months in the Peoples Republic of China as the visiting Artist at Shanghai University. He has been in numerous national juried exhibitions since 2000. His work is represented in many galleries throughout the country. Ryan currently is a practicing studio potter, Lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania, and an instructor at several art centers in the Philadelphia area. For more information visit his website .
Arlington Cultural Affairs  (administrative office)
1100 North Glebe Road, Suite 1500
Arlington, VA. 22201
Phone: 703-228-1850
Fax: 703-228-0805
TTY: 703-228-1855

Artist of the Day: Priscilla Mouritzen


All the pinched bowls are the same size: hand-sized – as is demanded by the pinching process. They show all the variety and movement which porcelain clay allows and which the vagaries of wood firing embellishes them with. At the same time their inate ”pinched” quality gives them life and liveliness. The works show an exploration of pattern in which echoes of my childhood in Africa can be detected.

http://www,priscillamouritzen.dk