online workshop: The Head in Clay with Cristina Cordova

Because of the slow, gradual unfolding of a clay sculpture it is often hard to relay the full arc of a piece from beginning to end in the traditional workshop context. This course will offer an intimate vantage point to study and understand all of the steps, tools and materials that come into play to create a clay head. With the methods showcased in this course and the open floor chat sessions between demonstrations to answer questions you will be fully empowered to create clay heads of different scales in your own studio. This course includes supplemental printed material that follows the course structure and several opt-ins to customize your experience.

Curriculum:

VIDEO MODULE 1: Before We BeginTools, Materials and Workspace Setup

VIDEO MODULE 2: Sourcing Anatomical References

VIDEO MODULE 3: Hollow Construction With Easy Patterns At Any Scale

VIDEO MODULE 4: The Skull Basics

VIDEO MODULE 5: Adding Features and Introducing Tools

VIDEO MODULE 6: Tricks and Techniques for Refining and Cleaning the Face

Registration: http://travel-arte.squarespace.com/new-page-1

monday morning eye candy: Thaddeus Erdahl

When considering the murky reservoir of human history, it is
difficult to separate legend from reality. Through my work, I examine
human myth in the modern age, specifically on characters that emerge
from our society’s underbelly; the less popular folk. Using their
“legends”, I feel compelled to tell stories that illustrate analogies in
life; blending together archetypes, shared experiences, and my own
personal mythology. Who we are in the world is a kaleidoscope of
interpretations, biased memories, and personal connections. 


Ceramic sculpture and portraiture, in particular, are
forms of a visual narration that I use to satisfy my urge for
documenting what I see in human nature. Evocative of well-loved toys and
obsolete artifacts, I use the implied history of these objects to
encourage the viewer to disconnect from the present situation and
conjure their own individual narratives from my sculptures.


Working with concepts that are personal and sometimes
narcissistic perceptions of the gloomy side of life, dark humor is my
buffer. Dry or irreverent, it is humor that mystifies the tragic. – Thaddeus Erdahl


emerging artist: Yen Yen Lo

“My surly-looking bell figurines are inspired by the people I see around me – particularly on public transport and in my neighbourhood. Nostalgia and reminiscences play an integral part in my work, especially childhood memories of growing up in Malaysia and the people who made an impression on me. I’ve always adopted a stylised form of illustration and love bringing these characters to life with expressive line brushwork and a good dose of humour.”