education opportunity: Minnesota New Institute for Ceramic Education

Northern Clay Center presents an advanced ceramics studio program in collaboration with ceramic artist and educator, Ursula Hargens. The New Institute for Ceramic Education provides up to 8 months of advanced, personalized instruction for artists who are serious about taking the next step in their ceramic education.

This pilot program is designed to respond to the changing needs of students and gives non-traditional students the same quality of information and critique found in a university program.  Designed for potters and sculptors alike, the Institute will support the development of studio work and provide high-level training in ceramic materials, history and theory, and professional practices.

Participants will earn a certificate of completion through a combination of instruction and individual mentoring. The program will extend beyond the classroom to include artist lectures, gallery tours, and studio visits with established artists to take advantage of the rich ceramic resources throughout the Twin Cities, including those from academic and non-traditional routes of study, artists of other media, and arts administrators.

Get updates about MN NICE classes, visiting artists, and events on the NCC blog. 

What can you hope to achieve from this program?

By the end of the 8-month program, students will earn a certificate and will possess the technical skills, artistic context, and personal insight to build a strong and cohesive body of work. They will learn how to present and promote their work, whether they are seeking gallery representation, applying to graduate school, or selling work to the public.

MN NICE combines the best aspects of a residency, university program, and apprenticeship. Certificate recipients will establish new connections with peers and established artists in the field, build professional credentials, and create a strong body of work based on individualized instruction. The program will culminate in a final exhibition at Northern Clay Center.

“It is not without trepidation that I look toward the future, but I am eager to stretch my wings using the tools, resources, and courage I have discovered through MN NICE.
I feel honored and proud to have been a part of this program.” — MN NICE participant, 2015-16

Is MN NICE right for you?

Now in its second year, MN NICE is designed to respond to the changing needs of students and to give non-traditional students the same quality of information and critique found in a university program. Designed for potters and sculptors alike, MN NICE will support the development of studio work and provide high-level training in ceramic materials, history and theory, and professional practices. Participants will earn a certificate of completion through a combination of instruction and individual mentoring, led by ceramic artist and educator Ursula Hargens.

Hargens states, “Many individuals are eager to further their ceramic education and seek a professional credential, but family, employment, financial, and time constraints limit their ability to do so within a traditional academic structure. This certificate program is designed to fill this gap, providing a flexible, yet challenging environment that responds to the needs of non-traditional students, giving them quality information, academic rigor, critical dialogue, and critique as they develop their artistic practice and strengthen their work.”

Click here to access the application form.

Listen to a conversation between course leader, Ursula Hargens and a couple members of the first group of MN NICE students on Ben Carter’s Tales of a Red Clay Rambler Podcast.

Find out more here: www.northernclaycenter.org/education/minnesota-new-institute-ceramic-education

call for artists: Bursary opportunities for Metchosin International Summer School of the Arts

Each year, the Metchosin International Summer School of the Arts is proud to be able to offer a number of full and partial bursaries to practicing Canadian artists. Financial assistance is available through the MISSA Bursary Program, for artists working in any medium, and the Betty Burroughs Memorial Fund for ceramic artists. MISSA also awards a number of Emerging Artist Bursaries to emerging artists 19-29 years old. Bursaries are available on a one-time basis and are applicable to any course offered at MISSA.

Bursary Application Process

Please email the scanned completed application form, 4-5 images and a brief bio combined as one PDF document which is under 4MB in size (please use low res images in your file) , to the Executive Director : ed@missa.ca Applications due April 15, 2017. Only those applications which comply with the single PDF file format will be considered. Thank you.

MISSA BURSARY application 2017 [pdf]
MISSA BURSARY application 2017 [Word document]

Selection is undertaken by the Board of Directors and is based on artistic merit, financial need and commitment to art. Partial bursaries typically cover the workshop tuition. Full bursaries cover both tuition and accommodation & meals. Bursaries do not include required course supplies or travel expenses. Recipients are required to contribute a minimum of four hours volunteer time per week and to write a brief report outlining their MISSA experience.

The Vancouver Island Potters Guild offers a Betty Burroughs Memorial Bursary to members of their guild.  APPLICATION DEADLINE HAS BEEN EXTENDED UNTIL THE END OF APRIL. Please contact the Guild directly for further details.

emerging artist: Logan Wall

“As a designer and producer of functional ceramics I focus on the experience of the useful object. The challenge in creating complex and geometric forms inspires my initial process of design. I draw inspiration from geometric abstraction and architectural elements with a formal focus in composition. The way that hands will grasp each object informs the shapes and surface treatments I use.

I limit myself to simple variation of squares, circles, and triangles for use in form and glaze work. Working in both subtractive and additive ways creates seemingly endless possibilities of composition. Because of this I find myself in a constant state of experimentation. Much of my work is first thrown on the wheel and then altered or assembled. I use molds and hand building techniques to achieve sharp lines and precise forms. Creating various planes on a three-dimensional object provides different perspectives when addressing the surface with glaze.

The glazing process is a time to reflect on each form. I use a variety of gloss and matte glazes to address the functional and sensory aspects of utilitarian ceramics. I glaze the surface of each object with geometric shapes of vivid color to bring harmony to the form and strengthen the composition. This attention to design and tactile elements is meant to enhance the experience of the useful object.”

logwallceramics.com