Help Save Inspirations Studios

 

From their funding page: “We are heartbroken to share that Inspirations Studio is facing imminent closure.  For 23 years, the ceramics-based program has supported hundreds of low-income women who have been impacted by poverty, homelessness, addiction, trauma, and mental health issues.

You can learn more about the program here.
As we look for stable funding and a new partner, we are asking for public donations to keep the program alive.  Our target of 60K will sustain the program through 2018, in conjunction with funds we are anticipating from the City of Toronto and those received already from an anonymous donor.  Together this support will secure studio rent, bills, materials, and skeleton staff so the current members can sustain their essential income, continue to access a safe space to be creative, and maintain a sense of meaning and purpose.  As one member told us, “Inspirations saved my life.”
Although we aim to reach our target and sustain the Studio for one year while we find long-term funds, any amount raised will help extend the program beyond 2017 and support the participants.  Any and all donations represent a success and will benefit the women. “
Visit the organizations website here: https://inspirationsstudio.org/inspirations-studio/
Article about the Studio in the Star.

movie day: Armour by Keegan Luttrell

Individual protections, once made of iron, were meant to defend their owner and improve human capacities. They would shape the body to act as a second layer, define one’s identity and belonging, and maybe, repulse the adversary. From head to toe, covered by her all-in-one, how would Joan of Arc feel wearing her “victorious” harness while marching on Paris?

The inhabitants of an armour chose whether they wanted it to be light and adherent or massive and constructing, either allowing a greater rapidity of movement but with less efficiency or defensive but rigid and heavy, constricting the range of action. In each case, the protection reveals its fragility.

From chainmail to bulletproof vests or tribal face tattoos, the defensive shields made a long way since the heavy overalls and took diverse outlines. Kevlar, polyethylene of molar mass, light metal, ceramic plates or ink; materials and forming varied and evolved regarding mobility and clinging functions to such an extent, that they tend to become imperceptible.

Keegan Luttrell extends this investigation field to other forms of protection or self-defense. Her interest focuses exactly on the invisiblearmours, involved in a daily context. The ones we wear on facial features or disguised under gestures and behaviors.

Through her analysis and in the exhibition taking place, they become tangible, as to allow a closer observation, as if we could even try them. Face lines converted into ceramic pieces strengthened by fire and shattering if mishandled. These fine bone structures are here engaged in a ritualized course, their brittles taken by fluids and movements, turning back into sediments, as the objects are activated by their dissolution.

-Marie DuPasquier

keegan-luttrell-mj0h.squarespace.com

 

Can Craft? Craft Can! – opening exhibition

Opening reception:  Friday, September 15th 6-9pm Art Gallery of Burlington
Aligning with Canada’s 150th anniversary, the Biennial will serve as a spotlight to celebrate and educate the public and craft professionals alike about the importance that Craft plays in our everyday lives. The biennial will provide historical contextualization of Canadian craft practise and offer critical insight into its future.
Comprising of four exhibitions and a two day conference, the Canadian Craft Biennial, in its inaugural year celebrates with Canada’s 150th anniversary, serving as a spotlight to celebrate and educate the public and craft professionals alike about the importance that Craft plays in our everyday lives. The biennial will provide historical contextualization of Canadian craft practise and offer critical insight into its future.

Can Craft? Craft Can! includes the work of:

  • Pierre Aupilardjuk, Carole Baillargeon, Louise Lemieux Bérubé, Beth Biggs, Robert Brown, Teresa Burrows, Karen Cantine, Bridget Catchpole, Kai Chan, Janice Wright Cheney, Brigitte Clavette, Jess Riva Cooper, Brad Copping, Marie-Andrée Côté, Gabrielle Desmarais, Brothers Dressler, Robin DuPont, Susan Edgerley, Michael Flaherty, Reid Flock, Pascale Girardin, Matt Gould, Igah Hainnu, Barb Hunt, Elisapee Ishulutaq, Jean Kagyut, Kawtysie Kakee, Benjamin Kikkert, Catherine Kiliktee, Elsie Klengenberg, Sandra Ledingham, Lou Lynn, Janet Macpherson, Michael Massie, Bettina Matzkuhn, Paul McClure, Caroline Ouellette, Greg Payce, Luce Pelletier, Gord Peteran, Claudio Pino, Anne Drew Potter, Elizabeth Quiningnaaq, Shona Rae, Pamela Ritchie, Ruth Scheuing, Amir Sheikhvand, Wendy Shirran, Eva Siakuluk, Greg Sims, Anita Singh, Cheryl Wilson Smith, EartHand Gleaners Society, Despo Sophocleous, Susan Surette, Winnie Tatya, Ningeokuluk Teevee, Yvonne Thomas, Barbara Tipton, Anna Torma, Annie Tung, Jessica Vellenga, Angelika Werth, Zane Wilcox