technical tuesday: a must read about envy and ego

Some of you might remember fondly laughing in the audience as Jerry Saltz (@jerrysaltz) delivered his memorable Keynote speak at NCECA a few years ago. I see him as quite the quotable man at different points in my life and was taken by the following article by Austin Kleon (@austinkleon) (author of Steal Like An Artist) on the subject of envy for creatives which references a interview with Jerry as well. It’s a different type of “technical tuesday” on the blog I guess, one that asks us to be introspective,  but one we can all likely still learn from and think about in the studio today. I like to at least think i’m not the only one that feels creative jealousy and envy. If you can get through the day without feeling envious, well then I’m envious of you for that as well : )

Here’s to turning that envy into creativity.

“Nietzsche thought of envy as a confused but important signal from our deeper selves about what we really want. Everything that makes us envious is a fragment of our true potential, which we disown at our peril. We should learn to study our envy forensically, keeping a diary of envious moments, and then sift through episodes to discern the shape of a future, better self…. The envy we don’t own up to will otherwise end up emitting what Nietzsche called ‘sulfurous odours.’ Bitterness is envy that doesn’t understand itself.” (source)

Here’s the link to the full article by Austin Kleon: austinkleon.com/2018/09/27/an-enemy-of-envy/

call for artists: Exhibition Applications for the Saskatchewan Craft Council

Deadline: November 15 annually

The Saskatchewan Craft Council Gallery presents solo, two-person, and group exhibitions reflecting craft history, contemporary practice, and innovation. The SCC Gallery policy prioritizes showing Saskatchewan artists and curators, but aims to include at least one touring or out-of-province exhibition each year.

For each of the six exhibitions accepted to the Saskatchewan Craft Council Gallery annual schedule, the SCC will provide installation assistance; insurance; promotion; documentation; administrative labour; and artist fees to be paid to the artist(s). To assist the SCC with the cost of the aforementioned labour and staffing, a 40% commission will be retained on any sales resulting from an exhibition.

The SCC encourages applications from self-identified members of under-served communities. We encourage submissions from Indigenous artists, artists with disabilities, new Canadians as well as people from visible and invisible minorities.

Criteria

The SCC Gallery is committed to showcasing fine craft artists; other forms of visual art may be considered in addition to an exhibition that has a primary focus on craft.

Please ensure your application is complete. Applicants who submit incomplete, inaccurate, or misleading information may be deemed ineligible for consideration.

Each applicant must fulfill the requirements of the Exhibition Application Package.

Download the introduction and a helpful checklist here: SCC Exhibition Application Introduction and Checklist

Download the Application form here: SCC Exhibition Application Package

If you are having trouble opening the PDFs in your browser please try the following steps:

  • Download the file directly
  • Try a different browser

Certain conditions on your computer, such as security settings or browser cookies, can prevent you from viewing a PDF. Try any of the following browsers that you have not already tried:

  • Google Chrome
  • Mozilla Firefox
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • Apple Safari

If all else fails, email Steph and Maia at scc.exhibitions@sasktel.net and they will email you the PDF documents directly.

Process

The Exhibitions & Education Coordinators along with the SCC Curatorial Committee assess all applications annually. Information from each applicant is sent to members of the Curatorial Committee prior to the annual review meeting, where proposals are considered along with their support material. The Curatorial Committee acts in an advisory capacity to the Exhibitions Coordinators. Applicants will be informed of the Curatorial Committee and Exhibitions Department’s decisions following the curatorial meeting in late December – mid January of each year. Additional Curatorial Committee meetings may be scheduled as decided by the Exhibitions and Education Coordinators.

In preparing your application, please consult the SCC’s archive of previous exhibitions, as well as the SCC gallery floorplan.

You can also refer to this blog post for more information or tips for submitting your proposal!

Questions can be directed to:

Stephanie Canning or Maia Stark
Exhibitions and Education Coordinators
scc.exhibitions@sasktel.net
306-653-3616 ext 2

saskcraftcouncil.org

movie day: Ceramic artist Joy Trpkovic

Joy Trpkovic is an award winning ceramic artist. She works predominantly in porcelain, creating distinctive translucent vessels, wall installations and collections of tiny sculptures inspired by sea forms, strata, fossils and funghi. http://www.createdbespoke.com/artist/Joy Joy studied Fine Art at Goldsmiths’ College in London, Portsmouth University and University of Sussex. Her Fine Art education as a painter enriches her work as a studio ceramicist and allows her to approach using clay with aesthetic and technical freedom. After teaching Art for some years, Joy set up her own studio. Since 1979, her work has been widely exhibited in Britain, Europe and the U.S.A; in Minnesota, Zurich, Basle, New Delhi and most recently, Alcora, Spain; and she has enjoyed numerous solo exhibitions in England. Joy’s work is held in public collections at Southampton City Museum and Art gallery, Leicester County Council and the Permanent Collection at the Museum of Ceramics, Alcora, Spain. Creating with porcelain that has been aged to increase plasticity for hand building, Joy uses only the simplest tools – fingers, the palm of a hand, a scalpel, a small boxwood stick and fine paintbrushes. Joy prefers direct contact with the clay rather than casting or throwing, although her preferred process is much more time consuming. Joy aims for delicate translucency in her work and enjoys the risks inherent in using porcelain as it grows and shrinks during firing – Her thinnest vessels are made from 0.5mm sheet. Mini sculptures are assembled in bespoke acrylic box frames to enable all round viewing and light passing through. Some Shard Wall Pieces are inserted into board and then framed with museum glass to avoid reflections.